No win, no fee lawyers news
18/02/2010

Insurance Bureau would benefit claimants

No-win, no-fee lawyers in the UK have voiced their support for a proposed Employers' Liability Insurance Bureau (ELIB), a body that would help claimants secure 100 percent compensation even when they're unable to trace their employers' liability insurer.

Although in the early stages of proposal, a Department for Work and Pensions (DWP) consultation on the issue indicates that the ELIB would be supported by an Employers' Liability Tracing Office (ELTO), which, by providing a comprehensive database of liability policies, would make it easier for no-win, no-fee lawyers to represent occupational injury and illness claimants.

Any such move would be a marked improvement on the existing voluntary tracing service, which, despite the best efforts of many claimant legal teams, has still resulted in more than 3,000 deserving claimants being left uncompensated.

The ELIB would serve a similar function to the Motor Insurers' Bureau, which currently has responsibility for compensating those injured in car crashes by uninsured and untraceable drivers.

"This positive move is as welcome as it is overdue. We have said for many years that what is good enough for road traffic accident victims is good enough for the workers," commented a no-win, no-fee lawyer from a prominent national firm.

While a spokesperson from the Association for Personal Injury Lawyers said that the government must take advantage of the current climate of momentum and push for the proposals. "Injured and dying people have waited too long for this development for it to founder in the party political waters of the election. Cross-party commitment to urgent action must be made so more people do not die uncompensated," he said.

 

 
 
 
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